Making a herbal garden

A lot of people are scrambling to create small herbal gardens. After buying more herbs at the store and most likely failing it’s a long way to go to want to try herbs again. But it is not as hard as you think, it’s just the point of view that might have been a little wrong.

Urtehage

Visit with Siri

We have visited Siri Brodersen who runs SB at Grisen Storsenter in Tvedestrand.

She has a big heart for her flowers, and certainly the slightly hardy ones since Siri lives in Lyngør. A small car-free island in the ocean with charming scenery, and a small number of residents. The weather can be brutal at times, but Siri wouldn’t trade with anyone. After several years as a florist in an innovative environment in Oslo, Siri returned home to Lyngør, with the man in her life.

Siri brother copy
Siri Brodersen has a big heart for flowers.

We have asked Siri for tips and advice to create their own herb garden.

She’s bursting with enthusiasm. -Herbs are the easiest and funniest thing to have in the garden. When you get a little size on them, just cut them down.

Siri loves her Italian herbs. She imports herbs from northern Italy and is happy to talk  about them.

– They are grown outside and comes ready hardened. Italy has cold nights and is in many ways quite similar to our climate. There is a big difference between these imported herbs and those bred in greenhouses. In greenhouses, the herbs are grown in optimal conditions and thrive poorly if we put them right in the soil outside. The Italian herbs have more roots and come in larger pots, which in return makes them thrive better than the shop herbs.

The herbs from the store have peeler roots and smaller pots, as well as that they stand in soil that is not optimal plant soil.

There is a big difference between the herbs. Basil is basically an herb that can be difficult to achieve. They have different foliage and are generally a little less hardy. It is best suited for same-day use. But if you have shop basil it is possible to keep alive it a few days. Put the herb in a bowl and put it in the bowl, not from the top. You can get a Basil, but then it is recommended that you grow it out yourself, all the way. Certainly with a windowsill as a kind of greenhouse.

Herbs – a double pleasure

Oregano with flowers
Herbs looks beautiful and can also be eaten.

Herbs are basically hardy. But it is important that you are generous with the irrigation at first, so that the roots do not dry. It is important that they get to put good clutter.

Use good soil. They like the sun and well-drained soil. If the soil gets too oily and wet, they simply rot.

It may be okay to think about where the herbs actually come from. And that’s definitely a point. They come from rough winters , but also with lots of sun and dry soil.

In early spring, it is okay to hold back a little on the water, because it can still be cold in the evening and then the roots can freeze.

Herbs you can finely have both in jars and in-plant crates. In jars they can finely winter. It’s fine with a little size of the jars so that the roots get plenty of space. no one likes to have it cramped. They can have a long life in their jars, so don’t lose your courage because you don’t have a garden.

Thyme and Oregano are well suited as perennials, outside. They can grow wild everywhere over time. They’re self-spreading.

Siri says she often recommends herbs as perennials, then you have a double pleasure. More and more people see the usefulness of this plants. They come back again and again and look really beautiful when they are in full bloom. Even the herbs have a flowering period.

When I ask Siri what herbs she recommends, she’s quick to answer that pretty much every herb has got a place with her. The chives she has in large crates on the porch. Estragon, thyme, and oregano have been allowed to grow wildly around her property. Siri collects various herbs and makes her own herbal blend. Because as she says – herbs are so good!

Herbs Siri Brodersen replica
Pots and jars in fine compatibility at Siri Brodersen’s home

She also recommends to seed, or plant slightly different flowers occasionally in the herb garden. Certainly lavender, lion’s mouth, and marigold. Marigold you can so early spring when it is not colder than 5 degrees at night. If it is allowed to stand in peace, it will itself. Quite so convenient for a reason. Since most herbs have blue-purple flowers, flowers with little contrasting flowers are amazing. The marigold is orange in color and also thrives best in the sun. The marigold can also be used in food. Fine in salads and as a color additive in the omelet.

5 simple herbs

You can buy ready-made herbs and pawn them, as all of us can do. Check out a garden center. You can also grow them out herbs from small seeds to strong, beautiful herbs. It may seem demanding , but for a satisfaction when they are finally large enough and can be planted out. You can use a sunny window sill as a small “greenhouse”. The best result, you’ll probably still get your own greenhouse. There you can then in controlled surroundings. Your seeds need warmth and love. But there are many who sow at home on the windowsill, who get good results. I think it’ll be a little bit of a wonder how patient you are. I must honestly admit that I think it’s incredibly okay to buy ready-made hardened herbs. Then Somehow I’m sure not to fail. But there are plenty of hobby gardeners out there who love to grow their own plants. And who knows? Maybe there’s something for you.

If you’re going to plant your herbs in pots and jars, there are a few things to keep in mind.

  • Choose frost-proof jars/ Pots
  • Choose the right size of the jars. The roots thrive best when they have plenty of space.
  • If there are no holes in the pot, make sure drainage to your plants. Lecaballs or gravel are fine.
  • Use good soil.
  • Make sure that the herbs can withstand standing outside, and are fully cured.
  • At first, you need to give them plenty of water. In early spring, watch out so you don’t stormwater. It can still be a little cold in the evening.

Thyme

Timian

Thyme is one of the classic herbs. It’s hardy and perennial. You should plant Thyme in a sunny place. You can plant it in crates, jars or in the garden. Also remember that this is a good bee plant. Thyme is suitable for all dishes and it can withstand boiling for a long time.

According to author Gabriel Scott, the sprawling Thyme was “loved by the underground in the South.”

If you want to grow it out on your own, you can then look inside and plant them out after curing. Thyme you can multiply by helping of seeds, division or cuttings. Try your best look at what you like best.

Chives

Gressløk 1

A hardy and perennial herb. Blooms all summer. Planted in good soil in a sunny place. Thrives in a large pot. The flowers with which it is adorned are also edible ! It is probably not to overstate to say that this herb is so versatile that it fits everything.

Chives you can plant almost everywhere and it always finds a way to survive. But if you have it in pots, you have to take care of it in terms of water.

Chives are usually propagated by division, but you can then it if you like.

Sage

Salvie

Sage is hardy, evergreen and fits well in a jar. Planted a warm and sunny place in well-drained soil. It was used in its time to conserve meat, as an antiseptic and as a cure for snake bites. Sage attracts butterflies and bees. Fits well with chicken, fish and meat dishes, and as a flavoring in tea. The leaves are used whole as decoration, or cut as spices.

Sage is propagated with seeds or cuttings. Plant out when it is finished hardened.

Oregano

Oregano

Oregano is one of those plants that likes to stand in dry soil, but there must still be good soil. It must have a proper with sun, and can be nicely standing in pots. It’s perennial, self-spreading and smells wonderful. All in one. Perfect for Pizza, Pasta and various meat dishes.

Oregano is propagated with seeds, division or sowing. You sow it inside and plant it out after curing. It can withstand a little frost, but then you need to gradually get used to the cold.

Wild strawberries

Wild strawberries

Did you know strawberries are actually a herbal? It’s hardy and perennial. The strawberries like it warm and sunny. Fits well in pots and jars. It’s self-spreading, so you can find it in many places as time goes by. Suitable alone, in desserts, in jams,in salads, and the very best, right in the mouth.

Ground strawberries can then be ed directly in jars and bed in summer. It can be a little hard to see where you’ve sown, because the seeds are very small, but they’re so nice wherever they end up. You can also watch them inside and move them out when they are hardened. Wild strawberries can withstand a lot of cold, so you don’t have to be very careful with them.

When you’re going to bring in your herb, I’d do like Siri and make a good blend of all the herbs you have. You get your own flavor combination, exciting and completely your own. Remember that you can dry all the herbs, it makes it all the more fun.

Dried herbs
Dry your herbs and you’ll have taste setters for a long time.

History of the herb

Herbs have been, and are, very popular perennials to plant. They are hardy, spread quickly and taste wonderful.

In Europe, around 1066, it was the monasteries that guarded well and well over the herbs , which at the time were seen as medical. A separate medical garden was common. When the time of the monasteries was over, it was the manor gardens that took over. In the 18th century, the herbs became a natural part of flower beds and kitchen garden.

In the 1900s and 2000s, herbs were treated like other perennials where they became part of the flower bed.

And today? Today we plant herbs like never before. In jars, pots, pallet frames and flower beds. We use them diligently in cooking, and many are still very interested in the medicinal effect they believe the herbs have. They are drawn in tea, they can color textiles , and act as flavorings in food. A versatile case one can say .

I hope everyone gets great pleasure from their herbs both this year and years to come. Please show us your herb garden 🙂

 

 

 

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